USB Stick Install Solved

I have been reading the forums here for awhile, and decided to figure it out.

Steps:
[LIST=1]

  • Download and install 'Universal USB Installer' - Universal USB Installer – Easy as 1 2 3 | USB Pen Drive Linux
  • Download Astaro ASG v8 iso - ftp://ftp.astaro.de/Astaro_Security_Gateway/v8/software_appliance/iso/
  •  Open the Universal USB Installer,  for Step 1: Select the last option, 'Try Unlisted Linux ISO (New Syslinux)'
  •  For Step 2: Select the Astaro ISO
  •  For Step 3: Select your USB Key. I used a 512MB U3 Kingston
  •  Click 'Create', Eject the USB Key and Boot your soon-to-be Astaro Box
  •  Press  to Start the Installer 
  •  On the First Screen, hit Alt-F2.
  •  Follow this sequence:
    [LIST=1]
  •  bash-3.2# mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt
  •  bash-3.2# cd /install
  •  bash-3.2# mkdir install
  •  bash-3.2# cd install
  •  bash-3.2# cp -a /mnt/install/* .
  •  Hit Alt-F1

[/LIST]

  •  Finish the Installation, Reboot and Enjoy.

[/LIST]

Please post questions, experiences etc. This has worked for me, but it's my first experience with Astaro, so I thought I'd share in hopes others can benefit.

Cheers,
-fred

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  • I have just repeated this.  I have no Unix knowledge but it went OK.

    I used Rufus and it worked without issue. No renaming or anything.

    I booted from the USB key (I needed to change the device boot order in the BIOS) and started the install.

    Once the hardware was identified and the disk format began I switched to the console by pressing ALT + F2

    Then I remounted the installation media by typing mount /dev/sdb1 /install

    After the mount successful message I pressed ALT + F1 to return to the install and waited for it to complete ( remove installation media and reboot message displayed)

    None of the above is new.  All credit goes to those who have gone before in this post, but hopefully it corrects a couple of typos (unix experts would just know it was wrong - those like me do not!)  It also confirms it works with 9.306 which is the version available for download in Feb 2015
  • After about 2 hours of trial and error, this part did it for me:

    Once the hardware was identified and the disk format began I switched to the console by pressing ALT + F2 

    Then I remounted the installation media by typing mount /dev/sdb1 /install 

     

    Now I am a noob with no linux exposure and was having an issue with this command mount /dev/sdb1 /install

    And the reason was that I was not putting the space before the /install and was getting an error message it could not find the directory. [face palm]

     

    So the way I did it was after the last step to format the drive and start the install. As soon as I hit <Yes>, I switch to the console by pressing ALT+F2

    then run the below command really fast

     

    •  bash-3.2# mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt
    •  bash-3.2# cd /install
    •  bash-3.2# mkdir install
    •  bash-3.2# cd install
    •  bash-3.2# cp -a /mnt/install/* .

    ***NOTE THAT THE LAST COMMAND HAS A SPACE AND A PERIOD IN IT AT THE END***  (that was the main reason I spent 2 hours figuring this out)

     

    I don't think it matters how the usb was created, as long as you are able to get to the install page. I used Yumi which is a multiboot usb installer.

     

     

  • Thanks for sharing this. Two comments based on my experiance. 1: The USB doesn’t always mount to sdb1. It’s described elseware in this thread how to check which one to use. 2: Some USB installers have a limitation on the lenght of the path and will fail because of this. Good to hear that Yumi works.
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  • Thanks for sharing this. Two comments based on my experiance. 1: The USB doesn’t always mount to sdb1. It’s described elseware in this thread how to check which one to use. 2: Some USB installers have a limitation on the lenght of the path and will fail because of this. Good to hear that Yumi works.
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